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Support Services Administration Series - OPM

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

Position Classification Standard for Support Services Administration Series, GS-0342 Table of Contents SERIES DEFINITION.................................................................................................................................... 2 EXCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 2 DEFINITIONS OF TYPICAL SUPPORT SERVICES FUNCTIONS ............................................................. 2 SERIES COVERAGE ................................................................................................................................... 4 TITLES .......................................................................................................................................................... 6 EVALUATION OF POSITIONS .................................................................................................................... 6 CLASSIFICATION FACTORS...................................................................................................................... 7 FACTOR 1 - NATURE OF SERVICES..................................................................................................... 8 FACTOR 2 - ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT............................................................................... 15 FACTOR 3 - LEVEL OF RESPONSIBILITY .......................................................................................... 20 GRADE LEVEL DETERMINATION............................................................................................................ 23 GRADE CONVERSION CHART ................................................................................................................ 24

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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SERIES DEFINITION This series includes all positions the primary duties of which involve supervising, directing, or planning and coordinating a variety of services functions that are principally work-supporting, i.e., those functions without which the operations of an organization or services to the public would be impaired, curtailed, or stopped. Such service functions include (but are not limited to) communications, procurement of administrative supplies and equipment, printing, reproduction, property management, space management, records management, mail service, facilities and equipment maintenance, and transportation. This standard supersedes the standard for the Office Services Management and Supervision Series, GS-0342, issued in December 1958.

EXCLUSIONS The following types of positions are excluded from this series: 1. Positions the duties of which are concerned with performance or supervision of substantive work properly classified in an established series, e.g., Mail and File Series, GS-0305; Management Clerical and Assistance Series, GS-0344; Telecommunications Series, GS-0391; Purchasing Series, GS-1105; Printing Services Series, GS-1654; or other appropriate series. 2. Positions responsible for managing, obtaining, coordinating, or providing a variety of administrative and management functions such as management analysis, personnel management, budget, accounting, contracting and procurement, data processing and others. Such positions typically have as their paramount qualification requirement extensive knowledge and understanding of management and administration principles, practices, methods, and techniques, together with skill in integrating such functions with the general management of an organization. Such positions are classified in the Administrative Officer Series, GS-0341.

DEFINITIONS OF TYPICAL SUPPORT SERVICES FUNCTIONS Some of the following functions may be found (to varying degrees and in different combinations) in nearly all organizations. There is no "typical" support services program. The listing describes, in general terms, some of the more common support services functions. It is not all inclusive (either in the number of functions or in the tasks described within functions). The listing makes no distinction as to the relative importance of the functions because they are not a part of the evaluation plan. Communications -- providing local and long distance telephone, radio, teletype, telephone to computer links, facsimile transmissions, and other types of message processing; accounting for

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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service costs; maintaining organizational directories; and planning and providing for similar services. Correspondence -- developing and maintaining correspondence management processes, including development and use of specific (or form) paragraphs or letters, correspondence style and format guides and manuals, action officer or suspense controls, and similar matters. Directives -- analyzing proposed and existing regulations and directives for conformance to style guides, for clarity, to avoid duplication or conflict with other issuances, and to recommend appropriate corrective actions. Emergency planning -- planning and studying the organization's programs for continuing operations or providing services during periods of natural disaster or other emergencies and assuring that the programs are reviewed periodically and given appropriate distribution. Files and records -- developing and installing systems for control of the location, arrangement, access to, and use of files; for maintenance, transfer, and disposition of records; for development of reference indices; and for provision of similar or related services. Forms -- providing for improvement of existing (or development of new) forms through a program of workflow and subject matter analyses, studies regarding need for forms in support of program needs, design, production, distribution, and control of forms and development of related guidelines. Graphics -- providing for design, layout, illustration, or other related services in connection with the printing of an organization's publications, periodicals, briefing charts, and other information or reference materials. Library -- providing various types of reference, research, bibliographic, and advisory library programs and services. Mail -- providing for all aspects of mail operations including receipt, routing, dispatch, and control of packages, mail, and all other forms of written or printed communications. Photography -- providing photographic and photographic laboratory services used in such organizational operations as printing and reproduction, training, records management, security, and public information. Physical security -- providing for the safeguarding of security classified materials and information, and the safeguarding of installations, facilities, or offices. Printing -- providing for printing, publication, procurement, distribution, and maintenance of stock levels; the recording of changes to organizational forms, periodicals, and publications; and in-house reproduction services.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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Procurement -- providing for the requisition, purchase, storage, and issuance of office supplies and such administrative equipment as desks, office machines, and filing equipment. Property -- providing for the management of administrative property through maintenance of records, by conducting periodic inventories, maintenance of depreciation accounts and repair cost analyses, disposal of excess property, and obtaining releases from accountability for lost or stolen property. Reports -- providing for the improvement and simplification of reporting requirements through analyses of data reported, analyses of the requirements and methods for preparation of reports, and assuring that reporting requirements are met. Space -- providing for the acquisition, assignment, and utilization of space within an organization (including design of office layouts and work areas). Travel and transportation -- planning and scheduling foreign and domestic travel itineraries, booking reservations, obtaining tickets, arranging for government or commercial transportation of personnel and property, and other services related to official travel and transportation. Typing and stenographic -- providing transcribing, dictation, and "word processing" services to one or more elements of an organization.

SERIES COVERAGE -- General. Positions classified in this series are primarily concerned with and responsible for planning, directing, coordinating, or supervising a variety of general support service functions that are essential to the orderly and efficient accomplishment of the work of an organization, or to the provision of services to the public. The relative importance of individual functions to accomplishment of such work or provision of such services varies widely among organizations. Similarly, the number and type of functions performed and services provided through a support services program will vary according to the specific operational needs of each organization. -- Organizational level. Positions covered by this series are found at all organizational levels within Federal agencies and departments. They range from operational positions responsible for providing support services to small field offices, to positions supervising the provision of support services to large organizations, to program and policy development positions at headquarters levels. Positions covered by this series are most frequently found within administrative management elements of organizations. Less frequently, they may report directly to the head of the organization serviced. Regardless of the location of the positions within organizations or the individuals to whom they report, incumbents of positions covered by this series share a common responsibility for assuring the performance of those functions that facilitate the work of the organization serviced.

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-- Positions covered by this series, but not by the standard. Some positions covered by this series cannot be evaluated through use of classification criteria contained in this standard. a. Nonsupervisory staff positions with planning, policy, or advisory responsibilities related to any of the typical support functions are classified through direct use of (or by analogy with) evaluation criteria for nonsupervisory positions in other standards, e.g., Management Clerical and Assistance Series, GS-0344; Supply Program Management Series, GS-2003; Transportation Clerk and Assistant Series, GS-2102, etc. Such positions are covered by this series provided the assigned duties and responsibilities are not more properly classified to a specialized series. b. Positions that require supervision of personnel engaged in provision of fewer than six of the typical support service functions are covered by this series. However, such positions do not meet the minimum requirements for classification under the evaluation criteria contained in this standard. These positions are properly classified through the use of evaluation criteria contained in the General Schedule Supervisory Guide. c. There may also be positions which are covered by this series, but which are properly classified through use of the General Schedule Leader Grade Evaluation Guide. -- Distinguishing between GS-0342 and GS-0341 positions. A particular problem relates to differentiating between positions properly classified in this series and those properly classified in the Administrative Officer Series, GS-0431. Support services chiefs frequently are responsible for supervising the work of large groups of employees engaged in the provision of many of the services functions typical of this series. When these service functions involve either one or two grade interval work at GS-11 and below and are performed in direct support of an overall support services program, the supervisory position is properly classified in this series. For example, the support services chief may supervise the work of Management Analysts, GS-343, in work related to the management of a records program because of the close relationship of records to the correspondence, files, and printing functions. Similarly, there may be responsibility for supervising the work of clerical employees in personnel, accounting, and other specialized fields. Support services chiefs who are responsible for supervising such work in addition to other support services functions are properly classified in this series. The key distinction is whether the work is concerned with functions and programs included in a total support services program. If they are, the supervisory position is properly classified in this series. On the other hand, the work may be related to the general management of (as opposed to provision of services to) an organization. The supervisory position in this instance requires knowledge and understanding of management principles, practices, methods, and techniques and skill in integrating management services with the management program(s) of the organization.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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The position would therefore be properly classified in the Administrative Officer Series, GS-0341. In some organizations, one position may be responsible for assuring the provision of both support services and general management for the overall organization (as opposed to the immediate support services unit). The general management functions in this instance typically require the performance of substantive work in such occupational areas as personnel administration, budget, accounting, contract and procurement, or other similar occupations. In many such instances, the size of the organization and/or the nature of the management program are of such a magnitude as to require the establishment of separate subordinate units such as personnel offices, contracting and procurement divisions, fiscal divisions, and similar organizational units. These subordinate elements are headed by responsible supervisors or managers. In cases such as these, the position charged with overall responsibility is properly classified in the Administrative Officer Series, GS-0341.

TITLES Support Services Supervisor is the title established for positions that meet the requirements for classification under evaluation criteria contained in this standard or in the General Schedule Supervisory Guide. Lead Support Services Specialist is the title established for positions covered by this series and the General Schedule Leader Grade Evaluation Guide. Support Services Specialist is the proper title for nonsupervisory staff positions concerned with planning, policy, or advisory functions pertaining to support services programs.

EVALUATION OF POSITIONS In order to be evaluated under this standard a position must meet the following criteria: a. There must be delegated authority and responsibility for the supervision of at least three employees who perform at least six of the functions described in Level A, Factor 1; and each of the employees must perform such functions for 25% of his or her time; b. The organization to which services are provided must be at least equivalent to Level A, Factor 2, Element 2; and c. The supervisory position must have been assigned duties and responsibilities at least equivalent to those described at Level A, Factor 3. The specific criteria in this standard have been developed to give appropriate credit to such inherent managerial functions as program planning, coordinative and advisory services functions that are typical of the preponderance of the positions in this series. However, no supervisory

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position should be evaluated to a lower grade on the basis of this standard than would be the proper grade for supervising a subordinate staff of the size and type actually involved as determined by use of the General Schedule Supervisory Guide. The factor and element values and grade conversion table in this standard are not intended to be used for the direct evaluation of "assistant chief" positions. Such positions may be classified in relation to the position of the "chief," or supervisor of the support services organization. Ordinarily, where the "assistant chief" is a full assistant to the chief, occupies a position in the direct supervisory line, and shares in and assists the chief with respect to all phases of the work of the organization, the "assistant chief" position will be one grade lower than that of the chief.

CLASSIFICATION FACTORS Three classification factors are used in evaluation of supervisory positions covered by this standard. They are: Factor 1 -- Nature of Services -- This factor measures the scope and complexity of programs in terms of (1) the nature of the services provided to the organization and (2) the extent of program planning and advisory services required of the chief. Factor 2 -- Organizational Environment -- This factor measures the impact of the organization on the complexity of the chief's work in terms of (1) the nature of the demands the organization places on the support services programs, (2) the size of the organization, and (3) responsibility for coordinating support services programs for subordinate organizations. Factor 3 -- Level of Responsibility -- This factor measures (1) the nature of the supervisory controls over the work of the chief, (2) the extent to which the work is controlled by guidelines and instructions, (3) the extent of the chief's authority in recommending changes to (or altering the work of) the support services organization, (4) the nature and purpose of the chief's personal contacts, and (5) the personnel management responsibilities of the chief. Positions are evaluated in terms of the criteria presented in the various level and element definitions within each of the three factors. Point values for the levels and elements assigned are then totaled and corresponding grade levels are derived through use of the conversion chart on page 29. (An evaluation worksheet is provided as a supplement to this standard.) Level or element criteria must be substantially met before a level or element may be selected, and only those point values that appear in the standard may be used. Specifically, to warrant assignment of a level under Factor 1, the nature of the work performed by the employees in the support services organization (or personally performed by the chief) and the consequent planning, coordinating, and advisory services required of the chief must substantially meet the intent of a particular level before that level may be assigned. In like manner, the elements or levels selected under Factors 2 and 3 must be those that are most characteristic of the duties and responsibilities assigned to the position of the chief.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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FACTOR 1 - NATURE OF SERVICES This factor measures (1) the nature and scope of the support services provided to the organization and (2) the extent of the program planning and advisory services required of the chief. The factor is expressed in terms of five levels. The lowest level, Level A, describes the minimum support services program covered by this standard. Each succeeding level thereafter presupposes the presence of support services functions or operations typical of the preceding lower levels. Many support services programs will thus contain support functions or operations and, consequently, planning and advisory responsibilities which are typical of more than one level. For example, files disposal work that appears at Level A is subsumed as one function of the larger records management planning and design program described at higher levels. Similarly, the maintenance of supplies and of property and equipment records, the physical inventory and the minor discrepancy adjustment functions that appear at Level A become a part of larger and more complex operations and programs described at higher levels as property and supply management. However, it is unlikely that some typical functions (e.g., providing punched cards, operation of switchboards, typing services) will exceed the lowest levels. There generally exists a very close relationship between the level of the functions, services, or programs directed and the level of planning, studies, analyses, and advisory responsibilities, and this relationship is discussed in each of the level definitions. Planning and advisory functions are a characteristic of supervisory positions at all levels. At the lower levels of this factor these functions involve mainly planning and advising on procedural aspects of the work (e.g., advising on the manner in which materials must be prepared for mailing or disposal, indicating how record materials are to be filed or indexed, or showing the information required to initiate a purchase order). At the higher levels of this factor, chiefs of support services organizations are concerned with studies of a continuing nature and with extensive planning and coordinating in connection with major program or functional areas such as modifications to an organization's records management program, planning for the large scale introduction of office systems or equipment to accomplish what were formerly manual operations, analyzing existing or new support services programs to determine how they can best be used to support the work of the organization, or functions or operations of an equivalent nature. Consequently, the chief of the support services organization advises all levels of management regarding the requirements and implications of such extensive and complex changes. In determining the appropriate level, therefore, both the nature of the services provided and the consequent planning and advisory functions required of the supervisory position should be compared with material contained in the level definitions. The individual examples following each level definition are illustrative and should not be used as the sole measure in determining if a level is appropriate. To warrant assignment of a particular level, the chief must be responsible for supervision of substantial work comparable in difficulty and responsibility to that represented by the illustrative examples, and for planning and advisory responsibilities cited in the level definitions.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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Substantial work in support services organizations is typically the work which the organization was established to perform and is usually equivalent to a specific classification series such as Mail and File, Management Clerical and Assistance, Supply Clerical and Technician, Travel Clerical and Assistance, etc. most work in such series may have some aspects of other series, and those aspects should not be counted as separate functions. For example, an employee in a file unit may perform limited records management tasks, may use a quick copy machine, may obtain supplies for the unit, etc. The substantial work in this example is File work and additional credit should not be given for Records Management, Office Machine Operation, Supply Clerical, etc. Support services organizations may also employ personnel in such broad series as the General Clerical and Administrative Series, General Accounting Clerical and Administrative Series, General Supply Series, etc. Credit may be given for specific functions performed by personnel classified in these general series. Substantial work, therefore, means work that requires that the chief possess the technical and administrative ability necessary to effectively manage or supervise the function. For the purpose of level determination, however, the phrase "effectively manage or supervise" should not be rigidly interpreted as requiring detailed technical knowledge of the functions supervised. Personnel employed in support services organizations are engaged in a variety of functions. Supervisory positions will vary in their technical expertise among these various functions. Effective management control therefore means that the chief has been delegated the authority to plan and supervise the functions assigned to the support services organization, to evaluate the results of work performance, and to alter the number of services or the manner in which they are provided in support of the needs of the organization serviced. Level A (8 points) This level describes the minimum work situation required for a position to be evaluated under this standard. The chief is responsible for supervising a variety of clerical functions that are largely repetitive in nature, i.e., those tasks which primarily require knowledge of the sequence and methods for handling or processing documents, transactions, or materials. Functions performed within the support services organization are largely repetitive and are provided in a uniform fashion throughout the organization to which services are provided. Planning and advisory responsibilities at this level are generally limited to the procedural aspects for accomplishing the work of the unit or the manner in which services are provided, e.g., recommending revisions to the sequence of processing operations in a mail unit, developing schedules for conducting the inventory of property in the organization, or conducting inventories of material stored in the organization's filing system in connection with a records disposal program. The chief is responsible for directing subordinates in their performance of at least six of the following functions (or functions of the same level of difficulty and responsibility): 1. Screening and assembling specifically identified records and files for storage or disposal in accordance with established records control schedules.

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2. Maintaining property and equipment record cards, conducting physical inventories, and adjusting route discrepancies. 3. Providing duplicating services, primarily through the use of automatic quick copy equipment. 4. Processing incoming and outgoing communications involving routing of mail by general subject matter throughout the organization, and checking outgoing materials for completeness and conformity to postal regulations and administrative guidelines for handling communications. 5. Operating small office supply and forms storerooms, reordering supplies to maintain predetermined stockage levels, and issuing materials to authorized personnel. 6. Placing routine service calls to lessors or maintenance contractors to request repair of office machines and equipment. 7. Providing typing and transcribing services where the material transcribed is primarily narrative text and does not involve highly specialized terminology. 8. Providing punched cards, usually on a production basis, for various administrative processes for offices outside the support services organization. 9. Operating a switchboard that handles routing of local and long distance calls and providing limited directory service for the organization. 10. Obtaining (or controlling the dispatch of) vehicles, such as sedans, or light trucks that are used to transport persons, mail, or supplies. Level B (16 points) The chief is responsible for planning and directing a variety of substantive clerical operations, i.e., work that primarily requires consideration of the subject of the transaction or the operation in addition to knowledge of the methods and procedural steps as described at Level A. Planning duties at this level are more varied than at Level A because they are generally based on studies of how functions are performed and provided, and the substance of the operations as opposed to the procedures. Advisory services thus cover a wider range of operating situations and problems because of the substantive nature of the work performed in support of the organization. The chief is responsible for directing the work of employees engaged in performing a full scope and range of operations that are typified by the following seven examples (in addition to Level A functions), or work of equivalent difficulty and responsibility:

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1. Monitoring a records disposal program for a category of files or file stations including surveying materials for possible disposal, insuring that records are disposed of in accordance with control schedules, advising on the methods and procedures for disposal, and preparing reports showing the identity of records disposed of or transferred, amounts of file space recovered by disposal operations, methods of destruction, etc. 2. Receiving, warehousing, issuing, and maintaining stockage levels for a wide variety of supplies and forms, and for office furniture, office machines, and other nonexpendable materials obtained through the appropriate supply organization. 3. Preparing bar charts, pie charts, scatter diagrams, or similar items from statistical tabulations, rough sketches, and instructions as to the desired type of presentation for use in safety awareness programs, fund drives, public information brochures, etc. 4. Designing forms for use by offices in an organization when this involves the use of a rough sketch and following design standards that prescribe such items as spacing, sequence of entries, grouping of related data, size, and line spacing. 5. Preparing purchase orders for conventional office equipment, supplies, and materials and for repairs and services, when this includes reviewing requests to determine if the information pertaining to items' description, price, quantity, shipping information, etc., is correct and that funds are available for the purchase. 6. Providing travel services for an organization, including securing route and fare information, advising travelers of most advantageous routing, issuing transportation requests, securing reservations and tickets, computing and verifying transportation, mileage, and subsistence costs, and reviewing travel vouchers for completeness, accuracy, agreement with itinerary, and compliance with regulations and procedures. 7. Maintaining records concerned with imprest fund purchases including authorizing expenditure of funds and maintenance of account records and purchase and receipt files. Level C (24 points) The chief is responsible for planning and directing the work of employees engaged in the provision of total support services functions that require the application of highly specialized knowledges and skills. Planning responsibilities at this level pertain to total functions of a specialized nature and require consideration of complete support services operations (e.g., records management, building maintenance and repair, etc.) as opposed to the studies involving functions typical of Level B. The chief consequently has significant responsibilities for advising (or coordinating with) operating managers on the means whereby the services provided can assist in accomplishing their missions and programs.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

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The chief is responsible for planning and directing the work of employees engaged in performing a full scope and range of work that is typified by the following seven examples (in addition to that typical of lower level), or work of equivalent difficulty and responsibility: 1. Planning the development of an organizational records management program (in accordance with general guidance from higher headquarters) which includes considering the methods and processes by which record material is created by an organization, how filing systems are maintained, and the organization's requirements for retention or disposal of the records. 2. Administering a property management program for nonexpendable equipment which, in addition to the maintenance of property records and depreciation accounts, includes responsibility for analyzing maintenance and repair frequency and cost, and recommending action to dispose of or replace the equipment. 3. Studying space utilization in an organization to insure optimum use and management of office layouts, reviewing requests from components of the organization for additional space to insure compliance with guidelines issued by higher headquarters, and recommending approval or disapproval. 4. Operating a photographic facility involved in making precise photographic reproduction of charts, drawings, or maps for publication or exhibit purposes, aerial photography of fixed ground objects such as buildings, bridges, highways, and runways, or compiling photographic records of the various stages of construction projects. 5. Studying an organization's reports and forms to determine the source and methods used to accumulate reports data, whether the applicable reporting procedures are being followed, and whether reports provide clear and concise information. Recommending consolidation or elimination of reports involving similar organizations, purposes, use, and reporting frequency. Insuring that requirements set by higher headquarters are complied with. 6. Providing for specialized building repair and maintenance work where the work involves formal advertisement, and development of detailed invitations for bid and requests for proposals. 7. Acquiring and maintaining reference publications used by employees of the organization. Included is the operation of a small library facility for storage and reference use and the acquisition through supply channels, purchase orders, or by interlibrary loan of materials requested by personnel using the facility.

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Level D (32 points) The chief is responsible for planning and directing the work of employees engaged in several major support services program areas. These areas are interrelated and include all (or most) of the procedural and substantive functions and operations typical of Level C and lower levels. Therefore they require of the chief a materially higher degree of technical, administrative, and synthesizing skills than do the services programs at Level C. At this level the chief's planning and advisory responsibilities are concerned with major support services program areas which are often interrelated and which require consideration of the impact of changes made in one program on other support services or administrative programs or program areas. Chiefs at this level regularly participate in planning conferences to advise managers on the ways in which new or revised support services or equipment will facilitate the work of the organization. The chief is responsible for planning and directing the work of employees engaged in performing a full scope and range of work that is typified by the following five examples (in addition to that typical of lower levels), or work of equivalent difficulty and responsibility: 1. Planning and administering a supply management program in support of the operations of an organization when this involves obtaining a variety of expendable and nonexpendable items and materials through central supply channels, direct purchase, and formal procurement processes. Included is the responsibility for analyses and studies in the areas of requirements determination, maintenance of adequate stockage levels and related records, and storage, issue, and disposal for the organization. Assignments typically require knowledge of agency/organization guidelines, programs, methods, and systems, and may involve preparation of organization guidelines. Changes in (or integration of) organizational missions and programs may necessitate extensive factfinding and analysis because of special categories of need (e.g., automation of operations, advances in office or laboratory procedures which require special use or high dollar value items of equipment, or conversion to different methods or procedures). 2. Studying and analyzing an organization's requirements for printing and duplicating services in consideration of such factors as the type and quality of reproduction required, lot quantities, type of printing equipment best suited to the need, (e.g., quick copy or offset press), integration of the printing function with other operations (e.g., graphic arts, photographic facility, publications or forms storage and distribution facility, etc.), cost of alternate methods of printing (such as contract printing), and optimum location and arrangement of printing plants. 3. Analyzing an organization's requirements for space and facilities based on anticipated volume of operations, known or potential changes in functions, workflow, and future plans

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for expansion or contraction of operations, and negotiating with service agencies and lessors to adapt existing space or lease additional space for the organization. 4. Planning the procedures, systems, and equipment needed to handle the receipt, internal distribution, and dispatching of mail and other materials for organizations where very large volumes of mail are involved (e.g., organizations processing materials to and from headquarters elements, divisional offices, or a large number of regional offices; organizations receiving applications for benefits or requests for information or assistance from a substantial segment of the public in an area roughly equivalent to a State, etc.). The nature of the program is such as to typically involve detailed study of the organization's mail system, the clerical and administrative procedures for receiving, responding to, and preparing correspondence or other materials for dispatch, and the application of automated systems to various operations (e.g., conveyor systems, sorting machines, envelope stuffing and sealing equipment, etc.). 5. Planning and designing graphic exhibits or printed matter used in an organization's public information program. Exhibit projects typically involve two dimensional graphic effects including the use of photographs, illustrations, captions and text, and non-working models to represent real objects. Printed matter projects involve comparable level work with periodicals, pamphlets, or other publications of the organization. Level E (40 points) The chief is responsible for planning, directing, and coordinating support services programs and functions that require a very high degree of analytical and technical ability in applying these services to organizational programs and functions. At this level chiefs are concerned with planning and coordinating total support services programs and operations, usually on an agency-wide basis (or for major sub-organizations thereof that operate autonomously). The operations require consideration and integration of the specialized needs of diverse operating elements within the organization and the continual need for advising managers about total support services where there are major agency or organization changes in such areas as mission, programs, or facilities. The chief is responsible for planning and directing the work of employees engaged in performing a full scope and range of functions that are typified by the following four examples (in addition to those typical of lower levels), or operations or functions that are equivalent in complexity and responsibility: 1. Planning and designing records management programs for an agency or for organizations within the agency when this requires innovative or substantially modified systems and procedures because of changes in functions performed, new legislative requirements, or technological advances. Such assignments usually involve substantial reduction in the number of forms, reports or files required, and the development of new methods and procedures needed under changed systems.

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2. Planning and directing nationwide supply management programs inclusive of such functions as requirements determination, procurement, stock and inventory management, storage, issue, and disposal for the headquarters level, as well as a number of field offices when the primary responsibility is for administrative supplies, equipment, forms, printed materials, etc. Assignments include the responsibility for determining and establishing supply program goals and procedures, as well as overall program direction. 3. Planning and managing a printing program when printing requirements typically involve several million dollars, and there is responsibility for management of a medium size printing production plant (i.e., 50-75 employees). Assignments include responsibility for formulating printing policies and procedures applicable to the organization and to other printing plants throughout the agency (or sub-organizations), and the responsibility for procurement of printed materials, including review of contracts for procurement of field printing. In this instance the printing officer serves as an authoritative source on the technical, regulatory, and procedural aspects of printing to all levels of management. 4. Developing programs and policies for the acquisition, furnishing, and maintenance of a nationwide system of field offices. Assignments include responsibility for negotiating with service and supply sources for acquisition or lease of real property, design and layout of office work areas, procurement of equipment and supplies, and for regular maintenance of facilities.

FACTOR 2 - ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT The organization to which services are provided has an important impact on the level of difficulty and responsibility of jobs of chiefs of support services. This factor measures that impact in terms of three elements: (1) the nature of the demands placed on the support services program because of the functions, missions, or programs for which the serviced organization is responsible and the complexity and stability of the organization; (2) the scope of the support services programs in terms of the number of employees that are directly served by the support services organization; and (3) any responsibility for coordinating the support services programs in field or subordinate organizations.

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Element 1 - Nature of Demands Placed on the Support Services Programs This element is measured in terms of (a) the complexities involved in providing services to support the functions of an organization and (2) the stability of the organization. The element is important as a measurement of the demands which the organization places on the support services program, of the difficulty in providing services in support of particular functions, and of how often the support services organization must provide completely new services or make major changes and adaptations in existing services because of function or mission changes in the organization to which services are provided. The complexity of the organization serviced and of the functions performed are typically reflected by the number and types of organizational subdivisions (each of which may require differing types or combinations of support services). For example, at the lowest level of this element, we describe a context of a small to moderate number of organizational subdivisions wherein all or most of the subdivisions perform similar functions or tasks in furtherance of a common mission. At the highest level, we describe the context of an organization with a large number of subdivisions and a large number of functions which consist of most (or all) of the mission-related activities that may be nationwide in scope. The stability of the organization may also have an impact, depending upon how often there are changes in organizational structures and changes in major functions, programs, and missions. Organizations may be relatively stable, changing only in terms of numbers or distribution of personnel, types of reports and forms, office and facility layout requirements, or similar changes. In more dynamic organizations, new equipment, research technology, scientific breakthroughs, or legislative requirements may trigger major changes and changes that take place over extended periods of time in staggered or developmental increments. Stability is therefore discussed in terms of how it requires the support services organization to provide completely new services or requires major changes and adaptations in existing services and the manner in which they are provided. We have identified five levels of demand for this element, Levels A, B, C, D, and E, with corresponding point values of 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12, respectively. We have defined Levels A, C, and E, the levels with which most positions will normally be equated. There may, however, be instances in which the demands placed upon particular positions will exceed the definition for one level, but not fully meet the definition for the next higher level. In these instances Levels B and D may be used, as appropriate.

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

Level A (4 points) At this level organizations serviced consist of a small to moderate number of functional subdivisions (i.e., 4 to 7). All or most of the subdivisions perform similar functions or tasks related to a common mission, for example, a field office, a training facility, or a repair and maintenance facility. The nature of the mission and functions of the organization are such that the support services may be provided in a relatively uniform manner throughout the organization. There are few requirements for special adaptations in the services provided, i.e., the majority of services may be provided by application of specific organizational guidelines and program instructions such as those governing the records management programs. The organization and functions in support of which services are provided tend to remain stable for long periods of time (i.e., changes that impact on the support services program may occur at intervals of 3 to 5 years). The changes generally entail expansions or contractions of existing services or making minor changes and adjustments to them, rather than introduction of completely new support services functions. Level C (8 points) At this level organizations serviced generally consist of a much larger number of subdivisions than at Level A, and frequently involve satellites or different organizational levels (such as would be found in a multi-State, regional organization containing several district offices, or a major military installation or command). Installations or facilities with host-tenant agreements are also typical of this level. The functions performed by these organizations are more diverse than at Level A, and usually include several major programs or functions. Considerable adaptation and variation is necessary in the manner in which support services are provided because of the number and differences in programs and functions that must be given support. Support services chiefs at this level regularly negotiate with and advise managers at all organizational levels concerning improvements in the services provided. Organizational and functional changes tend to occur at more frequent intervals (i.e., as often as two years), and require substantial changes in both the nature and scope of the services provided. Support services organizations at this level are often required to react within a limited timespan to provide entirely new or substantially altered services. Level E (12 points) At this level organizations serviced typically include a large number of subdivisions, many of which are comparable in most respects to organizations such as those described at Level C. Functions performed by these organizations consist of most (or all) of the functions performed by an agency, department, or bureau, and are usually nationwide in scope. The diversity of the organizations involved and the scope of functional operations require considerable adaptation and tailoring of total support services programs. At this level, support services chiefs are predominantly concerned with policy development and program direction, as

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

contrasted with Level C, where the emphasis is on refinement or adaptation of agency policy and on management of operating support services programs. Functions and programs at this level typically change as a result of new or amended enabling legislation. As at Level C, the changes place additional demands on the support services chief to provide new (or alter) major services, frequently with very short lead times. However, at this level the problems encountered in coordinating major changes to the programs are materially greater because of the increase size and scope of the organization and functions to which support services needed. Element 2 - Scope of the Support Services Program In general, the scope of support services program(s) (as measured in terms of the total number of employees in the organization) is only a crude indicator of the level of difficulty of the support services chief job. Moreover, there is no effective technique for measuring that precise point at which the level of difficulty is affected as an organization increases or decreases in size. In some work situations there may be large numbers of employees whose presence has virtually no impact on the support services programs. For example, when an organization employs large numbers of Wage Grade personnel in industrial-type operations, such employees typically require little if any support in such service areas as space design and management, correspondence or records management, telephone services, travel and transportation, etc. The facilities, equipment, tools, or parts that these employees use and the materials with which they work are generally provided by organizations other than the support services organization. What is significant, in terms of size of organization, is the number of office, administrative, or technical employees in elements of the organization that are directly served by the support services organization, that is, the employees who require the services in order to accomplish the principal work of the organization. Therefore, in determining the appropriate level for this element, users should include only that portion of the workforce receiving all (or the preponderance) of the support services. (Where the chief is responsible for coordinating support services programs in subordinate or satellite organizations, such responsibility is measured under Element 3 -- Program Coordinating Responsibilities.)

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

Five levels of program scope have been identified with this element: Level

EMPLOYEES DIRECTLY SERVICED

POINT VALUE

A

Up to 325

2

B

326 to 725

4

C

726 to 1550

6

D

1551 to 3050

8

E

3051 and above

10*

* - Extrapolation of additional points for this element is not authorized. Element 3 - Program Coordinating Responsibilities (4 points) Support services chiefs at higher organizational levels may have responsibilities for coordinating support services programs and functions within subordinate (or satellite) organizations (e.g., subdivisions of an agency, department, or military command), some of which may be remote. These program coordinating responsibilities are in addition to responsibility for the day-to-day direction of the services element in their immediate organization. Coordinating responsibilities usually include: (1) the development of organization policy for the subordinate support services operations; (2) periodic review of the manner in which subordinate units support the work of their serviced organizations; and (3) reviewing and taking (or recommending) action on the services programs of the subordinate units. To receive credit under this element the chief must: (1) have responsibility for coordinating all (or the preponderance) of the support services functions in the subordinate units, and (2) have responsibility for a, below, plus at least two more of the following responsibilities: a. The chief has coordinating responsibility for at least three distinct support services programs located in subordinate organizations. Positions responsible for directing three or more decentralized support services units within the same organizational component will not meet this requirement. b. The chief has continuing and regular responsibility for taking and recommending action on the program plans, budgets, and policy matters of the subordinate units.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

c. The chief is responsible for review of the operation of the subordinate support services programs through on-site inspections, analysis of management reports or audits, budget reviews, etc. d. The chief is required to devote a substantial amount of time (e.g., 25% or more) to direction of the subordinate support services programs.

FACTOR 3 - LEVEL OF RESPONSIBILITY Positions evaluated under this standard are supervisory in nature. Chiefs perform their duties under varying degrees of supervisory control and exercise varying degrees of delegated authority. Their work tends to be controlled or reviewed in terms of the adequacy of the services provided, rather than in terms of detailed control and review of individual tasks performed. The responsibility assigned to positions must substantially meet the intent of a particular level to warrant assignment of that level of responsibility. That is, only the level should be selected that is most characteristic of the chief's position. This factor measures the level of responsibility in terms of: (1) the nature and type of supervision under which the chief works; (2) the extent to which the work is controlled by guidelines and instructions; (3) the extent of the chief's authority to recommend changes to, or alter the work of, the support services organization; (4) the nature and purpose of the chief's personal contacts; and (5) the chief's personnel management responsibilities. Level A (16 points) At this level the scope and type of support services and the procedures for accomplishing them are largely determined by the chief's immediate supervisor. Chiefs at this level recognize non-routine or unusual situations and refer them to their supervisors with recommended solutions. Work is reviewed only in terms of the adequacy of the services provided. Guidelines consist of operating instructions and procedures for accomplishing the work, and agency manuals and guidelines that specify the manner in which services or functions are to be performed (e.g., agency filing manuals, instructions for retention or disposition of records materials, correspondence style manuals, procurement regulations, and procedures governing the receipt, handling and storage of classified materials). Most problems that arise in the work are resolved by direct application of such guidelines. In those instances where problems appear to deviate from guideline situations, or where guides cannot be applied, problems are referred to the immediate supervisor. The chief directs the daily operations of the work unit, independently adjusting assignments to meet peak workload periods, or temporarily deferring some operations in order to concentrate on more urgent needs.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

Contacts outside the support services organization are for the purpose of dealing with specific complaints or questions concerning the provision of services, or acting in a liaison capacity on specific matters with supply or service sources, lessors, or related organizations. At this level chiefs are responsible for making informal recommendations concerning such personnel matters as staffing needs, promotions, reassignments, or other status changes affecting assigned personnel. They direct on-the-job training to develop employee skills, advise employees of performance requirements and their progress in meeting those requirements, discuss corrective measures to improve performance, and prepare formal performance appraisals. They also resolve informal employee complaints, provide general explanations of the nature and basis for personnel policies and procedures; maintain effective employee, management, and union communications; and promote an effective equal employment opportunity climate. Level B (24 points) At this level chiefs operate under general instructions as to the objectives to be met in each of the major support services program areas. Individual methods and procedures used to accomplish service program area objectives are generally not reviewed in detail. Guidelines and policy controls over the work of the support services position are generally similar to those at Level A. In addition to directing the operation of the support services units, positions characteristic of this level are responsible for independently planning the work of the unit and applying accepted practices to resolve work problems. At this level chiefs have significant contacts with managers in the organization(s) to which services are provided. Contacts are for the purpose of gathering information used to analyze the need for additional services, equipment or facilities, evaluate the manner in which services are being provided, and to recommend additional ways or methods by which the support services program can facilitate the work of the organization. In contrast to Level A, chiefs at this level have authority for such supervisory personnel functions as initiating requests to fill vacancies or recruit additional staff members; initiating requests for position classification, promotion, reassignment, performance awards, and other personnel actions; selecting (or recommending selection of) applicants; and receiving formal complaints and grievances (resolving those that can be resolved at the first line supervisor level). They formulate and conduct informal training and recommend employees for formal training when appropriate, conduct corrective interviews with employees and recommend appropriate disciplinary actions when warranted, and take an active part in equal employment opportunity and labor relations programs on behalf of their work units.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

Level C (32 points) Chiefs at this level operate with substantial freedom in planning, organizing, and directing the support services program of the organization. Guidance is generally in terms of overall objectives to be met in supporting the work of the organization. The immediate supervisor is kept informed of progress by means of informal briefings, periodic progress reports, or program reviews. Programs at this level are reviewed in terms of overall adequacy of support to the organization serviced and by means of budget and overall program management reviews and audits, rather than review of specific support services programs. Guidelines at this level are generally the basic agency policy guidelines and operating instructions for the support services function. The chief is responsible for making major adaptations or recommending new policies where agency guides are lacking or completely inappropriate. Positions at this level have full responsibility for planning methods of approach and technical details associated with program assignments. Issues involving basic organizational policy or the overall organization goals to be met are generally cleared with the immediate supervisor. The chief's contacts at this level are more numerous than at Level B and generally are for such purposes as negotiating major changes in the manner in which the program supports the work of the organization and securing management cooperation for effecting or installing those changes. In the course of such contacts the support service chief frequently makes binding commitments for the support services program. At this level chiefs establish operating guidelines for, and coordinate activities of, subordinate supervisors in the performance of their personnel management responsibilities. They develop internal plans and procedures to assure implementation of various government and agencywide programs in equal employment opportunity, labor relations, career development, manpower management, and performance appraisal. They also take action to resolve controversial personnel management problems referred to them by subordinate supervisors, and approve, modify, or reject specific personnel action requests or plans of subordinate supervisors. Level D (40 points) (See Digest 5 for a discussion of criteria necessary for crediting this program level) Chiefs at this level are responsible for planning, establishing, and coordinating support services programs within the broad administrative framework of an agency. The methodology employed and technical determinations made are typically accepted as authoritative. Review of the work is generally in terms of how well the support services program is integrated with the total administrative program of the agency. Guidelines at this level include the basic administrative management policies of an agency, as well as the basic orders and regulations of service or other agencies, e.g., Government Printing Office, General Services Administration, Defense Logistics Agency, and others.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

At this level chiefs make recommendations regarding (or participate in development of) general administrative policy and support services program policy throughout an agency (or major subordinate organizations, satellites, or field offices thereof). They make recommendations regarding overall budget and manpower resources utilization and are responsible for program development and execution and for independently planning and carrying out those programs. Contacts at this level are generally with top managers of other major programs or functions within an agency, in service agencies, or in private organizations. The contacts are typically for the purpose of negotiating the resolution of major problems (e.g., impasses encountered by subordinate supervisors in their assigned areas of responsibility or problems encountered with top managers in other agencies about the provision of common support services). Contacts also involve the negotiation of changes in the procedures and regulations of other agencies when those procedures and regulations have a serious impact on the chief's own support services programs. Personnel management responsibilities at this level are similar to those typical of Level C in that they are primarily concerned with the broad policy and program aspects of personnel management and their relationship to the support services programs. At this level, therefore, personnel management responsibilities (though highly significant) are of a lesser degree of importance than the primary responsibilities for planning, managing, and directing overall support services programs.

GRADE LEVEL DETERMINATION Positions that meet the minimum requirements in each factor (at least 30 points) are graded at GS-5. Grade levels of other support services positions (i.e., chiefs of support services units) are derived by converting the total point values for all three factors to the grade levels shown in the following conversion chart.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342

TS-35 May 1979

GRADE CONVERSION CHART TOTAL POINTS

GRADE LEVEL

At least 30

GS-5

32-36

GS-6

40-44

GS-7

48-52

GS-8

56-60

GS-9

64-68

GS-10

72-76

GS-11

80-84

GS-12

88-92

GS-13

96-100

GS-14

104 and above

GS-15

ALLOWABLE ADJUSTMENTS The point ranges shown in the Grade Conversion Chart reflect the influence of the three classification factors on the more typical support services positions. Where points fall within the numerical gaps provided in the chart, positions may be allocated to the higher or the lower grade through application of sound classification principles and appropriate internal alignment considerations. In evaluating such borderline situations, users should consider any significant strengths or weaknesses in the evaluation of each of the three factors. Generally, positions that show significant weaknesses (i.e., those which meet only the minimum criteria for assignment to a particular level or degree in one or more of the factors) should be assigned to the lower grade. Conversely, positions that show significant strengths (i.e., those which meet, in full, the criteria for assignment to a particular level or degree and can be proven to contain elements of the next higher level) may be assigned to the next higher grade. SAMPLE POSITION EVALUATION SUMMARY IS NOT AVAILABLE

U.S. Office of Personnel Management

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Support Services Administration Series - OPM

Support Services Administration Services Series, GS-0342 TS-35 May 1979 Position Classification Standard for Support Services Administration Series,...

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